The starred chef “signature” card at the new restaurant in Manhattan, Meregalli of “Mulino a Vino.”
The simplicity of Italian conquest of the Americans, already reviewed in the NYT GIGI PADOVANI

Some flat door the words “Courtesy Combal.Zero”, and are the great classics of David Scabin as the “King of Savoy’s Veal with tuna sauce” or the famous “Skyline salad” or “Street-Style Spaghettoni.” Other courses are designed to raise awareness of the true Italian cuisine to New Yorkers, more and more fascinated by everything that comes from Italy, as far as the kitchen: “Octopus Luciana”, “Soup & Green green soup”, “Rack of Lamb the Romanas.

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Private and personal dining at the landmark Marina Bay Sands

Tetsuya Wakuda’s Marina Bay Sands restaurant Waku Ghin is derived from two Japanese words: waku (to arise), and ghin (silver) in honour of Wakuda’s favourite colour, found throughout his plush 25-cover restaurant.

The Japanese-born chef was based in Australia for many years, building a stellar reputation at the much-loved Tetsuya’s in Sydney – a former regular on The World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. But his attention has largely turned to this newer, more intimate restaurant in Singapore. Here the dining area is split into four private rooms of differing styles, varying from a muted grey-and-white walled room with carpets to a warmer, wooden-floored bar-style seating area. Each has a private chef preparing a seasonal dégustation menu of delights including whole abalone with aonori (seaweed) and fillet of Tasmanian grass-fed beef with wasabi mustard. Eight courses are served in situ before diners are led to a separate dessert room in which to round off the meal with two sweet courses while pondering the spectacular Singapore skyline and the views over Marina Bay.

For a more informal experience diners can head to The Bar at Waku Ghin, which features traditional Japanese-style cocktail-making and has an extensive list of premium whiskies and sakes – Wakuda was the first person to be appointed a sake ambassador outside of Japan, helping to make his selection the best in the world. Here a tight menu of nibbles is served, including caviar, oysters, cheese and meat platters.


André Chiang brings philosophical food to life

‘Octaphilosophy’ might sound like something dreamt up for an underwater sci-fi movie but it is, in fact, a well-considered approach to cooking undertaken by forward-thinking chef André Chiang.
Art and philosophy are guiding principles for Taiwan-born, French-trained Chiang. Octaphilosophy is his way of describing the key characteristics of his gastronomy: Unique, Texture, Memory, Pure, Terroir, Salt, South, and Artisan. Through his dishes Chiang explores the role these characteristics play in his food, and in gastronomy as a whole, whether it be grilled Taiwanese baby corn for Artisan; lobster, potato gnocchi and caviar for Texture; or foie gras jelly with truffles for Memory. Each dish could equally come under the name ‘simple’, with none containing more than a handful of ingredients in order not to drown each other out. But the cooking is also highly nuanced and champions food in unfamiliar formats and textures; the work of a chef at the very top of his game.

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