Restaurant magazine’s annual “San Pellegrino World’s 50 Best Restaurants” rankings have been announced and there are some notable developments from 2009′s list:

Noma, in Copenhagen, Denmark, previously #3 on the list, now sits atop the rankings. For more about Noma, including photos, go here.
El Bulli is no longer #1 after four consecutive years atop this set of rankings, perhaps not surprising as Ferran Adria recently announced he would be shuttering El Bulli for two years. El Bulli is now ranked #2.

Alinea, previously #10, is now #7, but more interestingly garnered the top American spot overall. This just two weeks after being named the best restaurant in Chicago, ever. To see photos of Alinea’s signature courses from Chef Grant Achatz, go here.
Alinea overtook Per Se as the country’s best restaurant. Per Se is now #10, and the third best American restaurant on the list behind Daniel, new to the top 10, at #8. Thomas Keller’s other restaurant, The French Laundry, in Napa, fell a whole 20 spots from last year’s list to #32.
Four of the top ten restaurants in the world are in Spain: El Bulli in Rosas, Girona, El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, Mugaritz in Rentería, Guipúzcoa, and Arzak, in San Sebastián, Guipúzcoa.
Danny Meyer-run Eleven Madison Park, with Chef Daniel Humm at the helm, rounded out the top 50 in its first appearance on the list.
Here are the top ten restaurants (from #1-#10) from the 2010 San Pellegrino World’s 50 Best Restaurants rankings:

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/26/alinea-top-us-restaurant_n_552379.html


Mario Batali’s thanksgiving will involve a turkey porchetta, ravioli, and a whole lot of ’97 brunello.

Thanksgiving is a time to spend with family and loved ones, and even some of the country’s busiest chefs know that. It’s a chance for them to take a step back from the everyday hustle and bustle and relax. But while you might think that this is a good opportunity to let someone else do the cooking, it’s pretty hard to pull a chef away from their stove, especially when their family is depending on them to whip up something amazing. These chefs might not have had a day off in quite a while (more than one is in the middle of opening a new restaurant), yet they’re taking the time to do Thanksgiving right. “I love the process of cooking Thanksgiving with my family every year,” Tyler Florence told us. “We can really get into the ceremony of it, and it’s a lot of fun.” Chef Jeff McInnis, who’s hard at work on a new restaurant in New York, will be heading down to Florida to be with family, including his daughter Bryce, before moving her up to New York.
And while many chefs brine their turkeys, two very notable ones — Bobby Flay and Tom Colicchio — don’t, and rely on basting instead.

Source: http://www.thedailymeal.com/what-famous-chefs-eat-thanksgiving/111913


(Reuters) – In an unfashionable part of Oslo, head chef Esben Holmboe Bang’s minimalist creations are stirring up food culture in a country where, a generation ago, the height of fine dining was boiled cod and potatoes.

At Maaemo, a restaurant squeezed between the city’s bus terminal and railway station, Bang uses exclusively local ingredients to rustle up the likes of langoustines with spruce, mackerel with wild garlic, and butter ice cream with brown butter caramel,

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The starred chef “signature” card at the new restaurant in Manhattan, Meregalli of “Mulino a Vino.”
The simplicity of Italian conquest of the Americans, already reviewed in the NYT GIGI PADOVANI

Some flat door the words “Courtesy Combal.Zero”, and are the great classics of David Scabin as the “King of Savoy’s Veal with tuna sauce” or the famous “Skyline salad” or “Street-Style Spaghettoni.” Other courses are designed to raise awareness of the true Italian cuisine to New Yorkers, more and more fascinated by everything that comes from Italy, as far as the kitchen: “Octopus Luciana”, “Soup & Green green soup”, “Rack of Lamb the Romanas.

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Private and personal dining at the landmark Marina Bay Sands

Tetsuya Wakuda’s Marina Bay Sands restaurant Waku Ghin is derived from two Japanese words: waku (to arise), and ghin (silver) in honour of Wakuda’s favourite colour, found throughout his plush 25-cover restaurant.

The Japanese-born chef was based in Australia for many years, building a stellar reputation at the much-loved Tetsuya’s in Sydney – a former regular on The World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. But his attention has largely turned to this newer, more intimate restaurant in Singapore. Here the dining area is split into four private rooms of differing styles, varying from a muted grey-and-white walled room with carpets to a warmer, wooden-floored bar-style seating area. Each has a private chef preparing a seasonal dégustation menu of delights including whole abalone with aonori (seaweed) and fillet of Tasmanian grass-fed beef with wasabi mustard. Eight courses are served in situ before diners are led to a separate dessert room in which to round off the meal with two sweet courses while pondering the spectacular Singapore skyline and the views over Marina Bay.

For a more informal experience diners can head to The Bar at Waku Ghin, which features traditional Japanese-style cocktail-making and has an extensive list of premium whiskies and sakes – Wakuda was the first person to be appointed a sake ambassador outside of Japan, helping to make his selection the best in the world. Here a tight menu of nibbles is served, including caviar, oysters, cheese and meat platters.

Source: http://www.theworlds50best.com/list/1-50-winners/waku-ghin


André Chiang brings philosophical food to life

‘Octaphilosophy’ might sound like something dreamt up for an underwater sci-fi movie but it is, in fact, a well-considered approach to cooking undertaken by forward-thinking chef André Chiang.
Art and philosophy are guiding principles for Taiwan-born, French-trained Chiang. Octaphilosophy is his way of describing the key characteristics of his gastronomy: Unique, Texture, Memory, Pure, Terroir, Salt, South, and Artisan. Through his dishes Chiang explores the role these characteristics play in his food, and in gastronomy as a whole, whether it be grilled Taiwanese baby corn for Artisan; lobster, potato gnocchi and caviar for Texture; or foie gras jelly with truffles for Memory. Each dish could equally come under the name ‘simple’, with none containing more than a handful of ingredients in order not to drown each other out. But the cooking is also highly nuanced and champions food in unfamiliar formats and textures; the work of a chef at the very top of his game.

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Can’t leave this one out. A fellow Successful Belgian.

Belgian’s food champion continues to inspire

Chef Peter Goossens has been flying the flag for Belgian fine dining for more than 25 years at his beautiful farmhouse set among the fields of Flanders. The rustic exterior belies the sleek elegance of the dining rooms within, which are adorned with modern art by some of the country’s leading painters and hand-made Belgian glassware, furniture and crockery.

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Switzerland’s star chef holds court in a breathtaking location

An 18th century castle in the Swiss Alps is the fairytale setting for one of Europe’s most enchanting restaurants, where diners are taken on ‘a journey of the senses’. Suave chef-patron Andreas Caminada weaves culinary magic behind the stove, creating perfectly balanced dishes that explore aromas, textures and flavours with great aplomb.

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Even as the upper echelons of the restaurant industry lean further towards the rediscovery and celebration of the land and culinary heritage, few can match the fundamental connection with nature evident at Attica. The menu at the Melbourne restaurant, overseen by New Zealander Ben Shewry, is studded with earthy flavours and foraged ingredients, while the dining experience is simultaneously sophisticated and deeply grounded.

A deep connection with nature characterises Ben Shewry’s unusual food

Earnest but warm and open, Shewry has gained the respect of his peers for his deep dedication to his principles of sustainability, to his family and to the cooking craft – reflected in his Highest New Entry debut in last year’s list. His cuisine remains uniquely imaginative and original, with dishes often referencing the landscape and memories of his childhood on the wild west coast of NZ’s North Island. King George whiting, topped with meat-infused butter, is cooked in smoking paper bark; potato is cooked ‘in the earth in which it is grown’; snow crab comes with 12 flavours of St Joseph’s Wort (aka sweet basil). Diners at this 50-cover restaurant in the quiet suburb of Ripponlea sometimes even step out into the kitchen garden for a between-courses alfresco snack.

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Back on the list after a year’s break, Jonnie Boer’s Zwolle restaurant is a stone’s throw from where he hunted and fished as a child. He knows his produce intimately and is keen to showcase it, having built a career out of championing local seasonal ingredients about two decades before it was fashionable to do so. His current menu is homage to the food produced in the surrounding area but there’s certainly room for global influences – monkfish comes encrusted with Middle Eastern baharat spices and mackerel belly paired unusually but successfully with cinnamon. Indeed, Boer is big on doing things differently: for example, he eschews the traditional citrus marinade for his take on ceviche and replaces it with tea, kombucha (a type of yeast) and vanilla. Later on, a combination of basil mayonnaise, tartare of beef and cream of oyster is served directly on to diners’ hands for a memorably tactile experience.

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